While many, if not most, colleges like to see course descriptions in their original student recommendations, there are a few strategies out there for those who just want to avoid writing course descriptions!

One method, of course, is to find specific colleges that don't want course descriptions or lots of information.

Some colleges may only have five minutes to evaluate each candidate and not have much time to scrutinize them. You can also choose Kids homeschool in San Jose at https://santaclara4kids.com/schools-&-activities/homeschool.

Sometimes these are colleges that don't need a lot of course descriptions.

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The difficulty with this, of course, is that you don't know in advance whether you need an explanation of the course or not. Sometimes they don't publish this information.

The second strategy is to use test results to complete your transcript.

This means that you provide documentation for an external test that can reflect the grades and assessments you provide your children as listed on their transcripts.

The third option is to ask your students to take the class in a different classroom, such as a classroom in city colleges, online courses or distance learning.

In essence, this is evidence that comes from a third party. However, there are some colleges that still need an explanation of the course even though your child has attended many classes at the college.